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Full text of "Announcements"

T- 





Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/announcements1975cath 



CATHOLIC 
' THEOLOGICAL 

UNION 

AT CHICAGO 






ANNOUNCEMENTS 




1975-1976 


THE FRANCISCANS 


THE SERVITES 


Sacred Hearf Province Eastern Province 


THE PASSIONISTS 


SOCIETY OF THE DIVINE WORD 


Holy Cross Province 


Northern Province 




5401 South Cornell Avenue 




Chicago, Illinois 60615 




(312) 324-8000 



Contents 



Academic Calendar 5 

General Information 6 

Administration and Faculty 10 

Student Life 14 

Academic Information 16 

Courses of Study 35 

Register of Students, 1974-1975 52 



CTU is aware of the right of women to full personhood. The use of 
masculine terms in the catalogue reflects the inadequacy of our language, 
not the philosophy of the school. 



Incorporated by the State of Illi- 
nois, as an Institution of Higher 
Education, November 27, 1967. 

Approved as a Degree-Granting 
Institution by the Department of 
Higher Education, State of Illinois, 
September, 1969. 

Accredited by the Association of 
Theological Schools in the United 
States and Canada, January, 1972. 

Accredited by the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Second- 
ary Schools, March, 1972. 

Charter Member, The Chicago Clus- 
ter of Theological Schools, 1970. 

Approved for Veterans' Benefits, 
Title 38, U.S. Code, Chapter 36, 
September 23, 1970. 

Authorized under Federal Lav/ to 
enroll non-immigrant alien students, 
October 28, 1971. 

Member of the National Catholic 
Educational Association, The Asso- 
ciation of Clinical Pastoral Education, 
The Midwest Association of Theologi- 
cal Schools, The Association of Chi- 
cago Theological Schools. 



Academic Calendar 

1975-1976 



Sept 


. 22-26 


Sept 


25-26 


Sept 


29 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


13 


Nov. 


27-30 


Dec. 


2-3 


Dec. 


8-12 


Dec. 


12 


Jan. 


5 


Jan. 


30 


Jan. 


30 


Feb. 


5 


Feb. 


20 


Feb. 


24-25 


Mar. 


15-19 


Mar. 


19 


Mar. 


29 


Mar. 


29 


Mar. 


29 


Apr. 


14 


Apr. 


15-18 


Apr. 


22 


Apr. 


30 


May 


27 


June 


3-4 


June 


4 



Fa// Quarter 

Orientation 

Registration for Fall Quarter 
Classes begin 
No classes 
FYP intensive 
Thanksgiving recess 
Registration for Winter Quarter 
Week of study and exams 
Fall Quarter ends (4:00 p.m.) 

Winter Quarter 

Late registration; classes begin 

Mid-quarter weekend 

Last date for M.A. comprehensive examinations 

for June graduation 
FYP intensive 
No classes 

Registration for Spring Quarter 
Week of study and exams 
Winter Quarter ends (4:00 p.m.) 

Spring Quarter 
Late registration; classes begin 

Last date for submitting final draft of M.A. the- 
ses for June graduation 
Applications for degree candidacy due 
Last date for submitting final draft of M.Div. pro- 
jects for June graduation 

Easter recess 
FYP intensive 

Final approval of M.A. theses and M.Div. pro- 
jects due for June graduation 
Graduation 
Examinations 
Spring Quarter ends (4:00 p.m.) 



General Information 



HISTORY OF CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 

Catholic Theological Union was founded in 1967 as a creative re- 
sponse to the call for seminary reform sounded by Vatican Council II. 

Three religious orders sponsored the school: the Franciscans of 
Sacred Heart Province, the Servites of the Eastern U.S. Province, and 
the Passionists of Holy Cross Province. 

The school was granted corporate status by the State of Illinois 
in November, 1967. Classes began in the fall quarter of 1968, with a 
faculty of 24 and an enrollment of 108. 

In January, 1972, Catholic Theological Union was accredited by 
the American Association of Theological Schools. The North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools granted accreditation 
in March, 1972. 

A fourth corporate member was added in July, 1970, when the So- 
ciety of the Divine Word, Northern Province, joined the CTU venture. 

Nine additional orders have now designated Catholic Theological 
Union as an official theologate: the Augustinians (1968), the Norber- 
tines (1968), the Society of the Precious Blood (1969), the Mission- 
aries of the Sacred Heart (1969), the Congregation of the Holy Ghost 
(1971), the Claretians (1972), the Viatorians (1972), the Xaverian Mis- 
sionaries (1973), and the Crosiers (1974). 

Catholic Theological Union is a charter member of the Chicago 
Cluster of Theological Schools, an association of six Protestant and 
three Roman Catholic Schools of Theology located in Hyde Park and 
the western suburbs. 

Catholic Theological Union is unique among U.S. seminaries. It 
is not a coalition of independent schools. Rather, the participating 
orders have closed their individual seminaries and merged their man- 
power and resources in one school, with one administration and fac- 
ulty. Control is vested in the Board of Trustees. The school has the 
advantages of unity of administration and breadth of tradition and sup- 
port. It has been accepted by its peers in the world of theological 
education. As it concludes its seventh year of operation, there is 
solid assurance that this unique venture will continue to develop and 
prosper. 



^ 



PURPOSE OF CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 

There is a living sense of purpose which guides a school more 
effectively than any written statement. From the very beginning it was 
understood that CTU would be a school for ministry. Theology would 
be directed to practice. The by-laws concisely stated this objective: 
"To train and teach men aspiring to the Roman Catholic priesthood so 
that they may be fully qualified to meet the requirements of such 
priesthood." 

As the school became more aware of its identity, it came to un- 
derstand that a comprehensive formulation of its purposes was neces- 
sary. In 1971, after much study and discussion, the following state- 
ment was adopted: 

Catholic Theological Union is dedicated to the education of 
students interested in ministering to the contemporary world as 
Roman Catholic priests. It also welcomes students interested in 
graduate theological education in preparation for a variety of 
Christian ministries. 

Its vision of the effective minister includes a mastery of the 
Christian heritage, a basic understanding of the other religious 
traditions, individual maturity and sensitivity to the human and 
/ religious needs of men today, the ability for personal theological 
reflection and the communication of religious insights and values 
to others. 

It assures each participating community and diocese all the 
courses necessary for ordination in the Roman Catholic priest- 
hood. The school offers programs culminating in degrees of Mas- 
ter of Divinity and Master of Arts in Theology. The thrust of this 
school includes a strong academic program that encourages seri- 
ous theological research both on part of the faculty and of the 
students. 

Catholic Theological Union envisions itself as an integral 
part of the cluster of theological schools in the University area. 
Its role within the cluster is to offer a Roman Catholic presence 
and it commits itself to utilizing this ecumenical setting as far 
as possible in constructing its theological program. 

It has always been understood that while the main thrust of CTU 
will remain the priesthood candidate, there can be adjustments of our 
purposes in response to the needs of Church and society. For the 
present, the statement corresponds with the actuality of our program. 



BUILDING AND LOCATION 

Catholic Theological Union is located in Hyde Park on Chicago's 
south side. This is a cosmopolitan, stably integrated community, with 
a strong sense of identity. Within walking distance are shopping cen- 
ters, theaters, restaurants, churches, parks, the Lake Michigan beach- 
es and the Museum of Science and Industry. Downtown Chicago is less 
than 15 minutes away by car or rapid transit. More importantly, it is 
close to the University of Chicago and its renowned divinity school, 
and to several schools of theology in the area: Chicago Theological 
Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology, Jesuit School of Theology, 
Meadvi lie/Lombard Theological School, and McCormick School of 
Theology. Extensive studies have concluded that the ideal location 
for a modern school of ministry is in a large city, near a major uni- 
versity, with opportunity for ecumenical and educational collaboration 
with other schools of theology. 

Catholic Theological Union occupies a nine-story building con- 
taining some 200 rooms. Three lower floors are occupied by administra- 
tive and faculty offices, the library, lounges and dining facilities. 
The upper six floors furnish residence for faculty and students, with 
individual community chapels and lounges. 

It is not required that students reside in the CTU building. Some 
communities prefer separate living arrangements. The Augustinians 
reside about one mile from CTU. Holy Spirit Priory in nearby Kenwood 
serves as the Norbertine residence. The Divine Word community leases 
apartments owned by the Lutheran School of Theology. Servite Hall is 
located in two townhouses in a nearby housing development. The 
Claretians have purchased an apartment near CTU. 

An open seminary in a large city fosters and demands maturity 
and responsibility in the students. But no other environment challenges 
the future priest to the kind of emotional and professional growth that 
he will need to minister in our society. 



LIBRARY 

The CTU library consists of 68,000 volumes, catalogued in the 
Library of Congress system. Of special value is the collection of 
5,000 volumes in Mission Studies and the History of Religions. Vir- 
tually all of the periodicals useful for theological studies and related 
areas of research, some 450 in number, are currently being received. 

Students of Catholic Theological Union enjoy reciprocal library 
privileges with the eight other schools of the Chicago Cluster. The 
Cluster libraries are connected by teletype, which gives instant con- 



8 



tact for inquiries concerning titles and other library sharing. A daily 
courier service circulates books and periodicals for inter-library loan. 
The total holdings of the Cluster schools number 700,000 volumes, 
the second largest assemblage of theological literature in this coun- 
try. 

The library occupies the third floor of the CTU building. Besides 
stack rooms, there is a large reading and reference room, offices for 
staff, and cataloguing and work rooms. 

The library is under the direction of three professional librarians, 
who have extensive background in theology and library science. 

CLASSROOMS 

The education building of the Chicago Sinai Congregation is lo- 
cated at 5350 South Shore Drive, one block east of CTU. By special 
arrangement one floor of this building, containing eight classrooms, 
has been made available to CTU. In addition, a number of seminar 
rooms for smaller groups are located in the CTU building. 

ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

The Lake Michigan beaches and nearby Jackson Park, with golf 
and tennis facilities, are in easy walking distance from CTU. An ar- 
rangement is in effect by which CTU students make use of the Hyde 
Park YMCA athletic facilities, which include swimming pool, igymna- 
sium, squash and hand ball. 

FEES 

Tuition $1,500.00 per year 

500.00 per quarter 

Special Students (for credit or audit) 150.00 per course 

Student Activity Fee 4.00 per quarter 

Board 1 ,000.00 per year* 

First Quarter (9/22 thru 12/12) . . . 365.00 

Second Quarter (1/5 thru 3/19) . . . 335.00 

Third Quarter (3/29 thru 6/5) ... . 300.00 

Room (9/21 thru 6/6) 825.00 per year 

275.00 per quarter 

Thesis Direction (M.Div. or M.A.) 150.00 

Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Graduation Fee 25.00 

Transcript of Credits 2.00 

* If inflation continues, an increase may be necessary. 



Administration and Faculty 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Acting President 

Vice President and Dean 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Dean of Students 

Registrar 

Director of Library 



John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.iVl. 

James Hartke, O.F.M. 

John Paul, M.S.C. 

Joan Petri e 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Edward McGuinn, S.V.D., Chairman 
Gervase Brinkman, O.F.IVi. 
Joseph Francis, S.V.D. 
Raymond Goedert, J. CD. 
Melvin Grunloh, O.F.M. 
Carol Frances Jegen, B.V.M 
Howard Kmak, O.S.M. 
Augustine Kulbis, O.S.M. 
Louis Luzbetak, S.V.D. 
James Lyke, O.F.M. 

Edward Marciniak 
Roger Mercuric, C.P. 

10 



DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 

Eugene Ahner, S.V.D. 
Norman Bevan, C.S.Sp. 
Michael Brophy, C.P. 
William Conroy, O.S.A. 
James Crilly, C.S.V. 
Martin Kirk, C.M.F. 
Howard Kmak, O.S.M. 
Ivan Marchesin, S.X. 
John Paul, M.S.C. 
Jerome Rausch, O.S.C. 
Harry Speckman, O.F.M. 
James Strommer, C.P. 
Paul White, C.PP.S. 

FACULTY 

Ahner, Eugene, S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Doctrinal Theology; 
S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; Ph.D. (Cand.) Fordham Univer- 
sity, New York. 

Boberg, John, S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Mission Theology; S.T.L., 
Gregorian University, Rome; D.Miss., Gregorian University, Rome. 

Bonner, Dismas, O.F.M. Professor of Canon Law; J.C.L., Catholic Uni- 
versity, Washington; J. CD., Catholic University, Washington. 

Dideon, Lois, R.C. Instructor in First Year Program; A.B., University 
of Seattle; M.A. in Theology, Andover Newton Theological School, 
Newton Center, Massachusetts. 

Dorff, Francis, 0. Praem. Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology; 
S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., Institute Catholique, 
Paris; Visiting Scholar, University of California and Graduate 
Theological Union, Berkeley. 

Fox, Thomas, O.F.M. Instructor in Old Testament Studies; S.T.B., Pon- 
tifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; S.T.L., Catholic University, 



11 



Washington, Dr. Theol. (Cand.), Friederich-Wilhelm University, 
Bonn, Germany. 

Geaney, Dennis, O.S.A. Director of Field Education and Associate 
Professor of Ministry; A.B., Villanova University, Viilanova, Pa.; 
M.A. in Economics, Catholic University of America, Washington. 

Gohmann, Myron, C.P. Associate Director of Library; L.Hist.E., Gre- 
gorian University, Rome; M.A.L.S., Rosary College, River Forest, 
III. 

Hayes, Zachary, O.F.M. Professor of Doctrinal Theology; Dr. Theol., 
Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn, Germany; Litt.D., St. Bona- 
venture University, St. Bonaventure, N.Y. 

Heisig, James, S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Religion; 
M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; M.Th., Notre Dame University; 
Ph.D., Cambridge University. 

Isabel I, Damien, O.F.M. Assistant Professor of Spiritual Theology; 
S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., Gregorian University, 
Rome. 

Karris, Robert, O.F.M. Assistant Professor of New Testament Studies; 
S.T.B., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; S.T.L., Catholic 
University of America, Washington; Th.D., Harvard Divinity 
School. 

Langerholz, Callistus, O.F.M. Associate Professor of New Testament 
Studies; S.T.L., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; S.T.D., 
Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; L.G., Pontifical Athen- 
aeum Antonianum, Rome. 

Leiiaert, Richard, O.S.C. Assistant Professor of Doctrinal Theology; 
S.T.B., Catholic University, Washington; Ph.D., Graduate Theo- 
logical Union, Berkeley. 

MacDonald, Sebastian, C.P. Professor of Ethics; S.T.L., University of 
St. Thomas, Rome; S.T.D., University of St. Thomas, Rome. Study, 
Princeton University. 

Mainelli, Eugene, O.P. Lecturer in Religious Education; M.A., Aquinas 
Institute of Theology; D.Min., Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Mallonee, Robert W., S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care; M.A. 
Loyola University, Chicago; M.A.L.S., Rosary College, River For- 
est, III.; C.P.E. Training, Lutheran General Hospital, Chicago, 
and Wisconsin School for Boys; D.Min., Chicago Theological Semi- 
nary. 



12 



Nemer, Lawrence, S.V.D. Associate Professor of Church History; 
L.Miss., Gregorian University, Rome; M.A. in History, Catholic 
University of /America,, Washington; Ph.D. (Cand.), Cambridge. 
(On leave Fall Quarter). 

Newbold, Thomas More, C.P. Professor of Pastoral Theology; Maitre- 
es-Sc-Med., L'Institut d'Etude Medievale d'Albert le Grand; Ph.D., 
University of Montreal, Canada. (On Sabbatical Fall Quarter). 

O'Malley, Kenneth, C.P. Director of Library; A.M.L.S., University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor. (On leave for doctoral studies). 

Ostdiek, Gilbert, O.F.M. Academic Dean and Associate Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology; S.T.L., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, 
Rome; S.T.D., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; L.G., Pon- 
tifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; Study, Harvard Divinity 
School. 

Paul, John, M.S.C. Dean of Students; S.T.L., Gregorian University, 
Rome; J. CD., Catholic University, Washington. 

Pawlikowski, John, O.S.M. Acting President and Associate Professor 
of Ethics; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Perelmuter, Hayim Goren, Chautauqua Professor of Jewish Studies; 
M.H.L., Jewish Institute of Religion, New York; D.H.L. (Cand.), 
^ Hebrew Union College-Hebrew University; D.D., Hebrew Union 
College, Cincinnati. 

Rausch, Jerome W., O.S.C. Acting Director of M.A. Program; S.T.D. 
St. Thomas University (Angel icum), Rome; Eleve Titulaire, Ecole 
Biblique, Jerusalem; Study, Notre Dame University. 

Schreiter, Robert, C.PP.S. Assistant Professor of Doctrinal Theology; 
Th.Drs. Katholieke Universiteit, Nijmegen, Netherlands. 

Senior, Donald, C.P. Assistant Professor of New Testament Studies; 
Baccalaureat en Theologie, University of Louvain; S.T.L., Univer- 
sity of Louvain; S.T.D. , University of Louvain. 

Spilly, Alphonse, C.PP.S. Instructor in New Testament Studies; M.A., 
University of Dayton; Ph.D. (Cand.), University of Chicago. 

Stuhlmueller, Carroll, C.P. Professor of Old Testament Studies; S.T.L., 
Catholic University, Washington; S.S.L., The Pontifical Biblical 
Institute, Rome; S.S.D., The Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; 
D.H.L., St. Benedict College. 

Vanasse, Roman, 0. Praem. Director of M.A. Program and Associate 



13 



Professor of Doctrinal Theology; S.T.L., Gregorian University, 
Rome; S.T.D., Gregorian University, Rome; Study, Oriental Insti- 
tute, University of Chicago, and Pontifical Biblical Institute, 
Rome. (On Sabbatical 1975-1976). 

Yoon, Hyang Sook Chung, Associate Director of the Library; M.A., 
Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; M.L.S., University of 
Texas, Austin, Texas. 

ADJUNCT FACULTY 

Burns, J. Patout, S.J. Lecturer in Church History; M.A., Spring Hill 
College; M.Div., Regis College; Willowdale; M.Th., St. Michael's 
College, Toronto; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Bush, Harold, Visiting Professor of Psychology; Ph.B., University of 
Chicago; M.A., Roosevelt University, Chicago; Ph.D., Illinois 
Institute of Technology, Chicago. 

Chiaramonte, Frank, C.S.Sp. Visiting Professor of Psychology; S.T.L., 
Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., Gregorian University, Rome; 
M.Sc. (Psych), Chicago State University. 

Donahey, Mary, B.V.M. Visiting Professor of Ethics; M.A. in Theology, 
Marquette University; M.A. in Philosophy, Columbia University; 
Ph.D., Columbia University (Union Theological Seminary). 

Lohkamp, Nicholas, O.F.M. Visiting Professor of Ethics; S.T.L., Catho- 
lic University, Washington; S.T.D., Catholic University, Wash- 
ington. 

Loiskandl, Helmut, S.V.D. Visiting Professor of Anthropology; M.A., 
University of Vienna; Ph.D., University of Munich. 

Pero, Albert, Lecturer in Constructive Theology; B.Th., Concordia 
Theological Seminary, Springfield; S.T.D., Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago. 



Student Life 



DEAN OF STUDENTS 

The Dean of Students is the official representative of the admin- 
istration for matters of student life at Catholic Theological Union. He 
works closely with the Student Executive Committee and the Forma- 
tion Council. He serves as liaison person between these bodies and 
the administration. He has direct responsibility for personal and ac- 
ademic counseling and supervision of students-at-large. 



14 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The basic organ of student opinion and action at Catholic Theo- 
logical Union is the Student Government. Chartered by its constitu- 
tion, the Student Government coordinates several areas of student re- 
sponsibility and participation in CTU life. The Student Government 
places representatives on the CTU Senate, and on the principal school 
committees: Admissions, Budget, Library, Curriculum, Rank and Re- 
cruitment. The Student Government is directed by the Student Execu- 
tive Committee, headed by a president and vice-president elected by 
the student body. The several participating communities also place 
representatives on the SEC. The SEC represents the students in mat- 
ters dealing with the faculty and administration, as well as student 
concerns in the Cluster. The SEC works closely with the Dean of Stu- 
dents. Mr. Alan Foley, S.V.D. is president of SEC for 1975-1976. 

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 

The thorough preparation of candidates for the ministry of the 
Catholic priesthood is a task that goes beyond the areas of academic 
and professional instruction. It involves the development of character 
and Christian virtue. Likewise a sense of social responsibility must 
be fostered, bringing the candidate to an awareness of the demands 
of selfless service. While this is not the direct responsibility of the 
Catholic Theological Union, it is a matter of notable concern for the 
administration and faculty of the school. This facet of the student's 
development is remanded to the directors of spiritual formation of the 
several participating communities. By means of public conferences, 
group discussion and individual guidance sessions, the theological 
student is assisted in formulating ideals of life and service that are 
essential to commitment in the priestly ministry. 

The Directors of Spiritual Formation live in residence with the 
student community. They are available at all times for consultation 
and advice. Care is taken that this service does not produce depen- 
dent persons, but rather promotes full human and spiritual maturity. 

Staff members with professional training in counseling serve as 
auxiliary counsellors and resource persons. 

WORSHIP 

An integral aspect of education for ministry is the development 
of a liturgical way of life. The priest is not only a teacher of the 
Christian message; he is president of a worshipping community. Wor- 
ship in faith has ever been considered a necessary adjunct to the 
fruitful mastery of Christian theology. 



15 



At Catholic Theological Union each participating community de- 
termines its own schedule of prayer and worship. A school chapel is 
available for the use of all communities. Communities frequently join 
together for the celebration of the Eucharist and a liturgy for the en- 
tire CTU community is held twice each month. These liturgies are co- 
ordinated by the Dean of Students with the assistance of the Professor 
of Liturgy and a student committee. Besides communal worship, stu- 
dents are expected to devote time each day to personal reflection and 
private prayer. 

FORMATION COUNCIL 

The Formation Council is made up of the directors of spiritual 
formation of all communities at Catholic Theological Union. It pro- 
vides a forum through which the directors share insights and experi- 
ences regarding spiritual formation. Also, the Formation Council 
agrees upon common policies in matters which affect the religious 
well-being of the student body as a whole, and makes suitable recom- 
mendations to the administration. To foster the spiritual development 
of the students, the Formation Council arranges for speakers, confer- 
ences and workshops. It meets every two weeks. Liaison with the 
faculty is effected by the attendance of members at faculty meetings. 
The Formation Council places two representatives on the CTU Senate. 



Academic Information 

ADMISSIONS 

Pre-Theological Studies 

Pre-theological studies have been the object of extensive study 
and consultation in recent years. The National Conference of Catholic 
Bishops in the 1971 Program of Priestly Formation, #289-320, and the 
American Association of Theological Schools in its recent Statement 
on Preseminary Studies have outlined in broad, flexible guidelines the 
kinds of foundational understandings the entering student ought to 
have in areas such as man and his world, religion, and skills of 
thought, communication, and language. Catholic Theological Union 
concurs with these statepients and has adapted its admission require- 
ments and recommendations to their spirit. Those wishing further 
guidance may write to the Dean for a brochure on pre-theological 
studies. 



16 



Admission Requirements 

All applicants must have a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent 
from an approved college or university. Applicants are also required 
to meet the following course requirements: 

(1) A minimum of 15 semester hours of philosophy which should 
include an adequate exposure to the major historical periods 
of philosophical thought. Other recommended areas of philos- 
ophy are epistemology, metaphysics and the philosophy of 
man. 

(2) An introductory course in sociology. 

(3) Two courses in psychology. Experimental psychology and the 
psychology of personality are highly recommended. 

Applicants who have not fulfilled these course requirements may 
be admitted to CTU on probation and will be expected to complete 
them as soon as possible during their first year of residence. 

Those wishing further guidance in planning specific courses for 
entry into CTU can request the office of the Dean for recommendations. 

Applying for Admission 

The general admission procedures are: 

(1) Request official application form from the CTU Registrar and 
return completed form with matriculation fee to the Registrar's 
office. All applications from students of communities partici- 
pating in the Union must be received by March 15. Applica- 
tions from all other students must be received by August 1. 
Applications will be accepted after these dates, but there is 
no guarantee admission processing will be completed before 
the beginning of the Fall Quarter. In such a case a student 
may be admitted conditionally at the discretion of the Com- 
mittee on Admissions. 

(2) Submit transcripts of all college credits to CTU Registrar. 

(3) Have scores from Graduate Record Exam sent to CTU Registrar. 

(4) Students applying for admission who do not belong to religious 
communities officially connected with CTU will also have to 
provide three letters of recommendation. If the person belongs 
to a diocese or religious congregation, one of these letters 
must be written by an official representative of the diocese 
or congregation. A personal interview with an admissions of- 
ficer may be required of the prospective student. 



17 



(5) CTU reserves the right to require screening tests of any ap- 
plicant. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 
Registration for Courses 

Registration takes place several weeks in advance of the quarter 
in which the courses are to be taken, as announced in the calendar. 
Late registration is allowed at the beginning of each quarter, on the 
days listed in the calendar. Any registration after those dates must 
be accompanied by a fee of $5.00. 

Changes in registration are allowed through the first week of the 
quarter. After that the course must appear in the transcript with some 
grade (cf. below, "grading"). 

Tuition for courses from which students withdraw with approval 
will be refunded according to the following schedule: 

Within 2 weeks - 60% refund 
Within 4 weeks - 40% refund 
After 4 weeks — no refunds 

Class Load and Class Scheduling 

All courses are three quarter-hour courses, that Is, they meet 150 
minutes per week for ten weeks. The eleventh week in every quarter 
is examination week. 

The normal class load is 4 courses (12 quarter hours). Special 
permission is required from the Dean to carry more than 12 hours. A 
full time student is one who carries at least three courses or the 
equivalent. 

Classes are scheduled Monday through Friday generally in the 
morning and afternoon. Some evening classes are offered. 

Grading 

Both the letter grade system and the pass-fail system are used at 
CTU. Further details of these options are found in the faculty and stu- 
dent handbooks. 

A = Excellent P = Pass 

B = Good WP = Withdrew, Passing 

C = Fair or Average WF = Withdrew, Failing 

D = Poor PI = Permanent Incomplete 
F = Fail 



18 



Withdrawals 

Students may withdraw from any course up to the end of the sev- 
enth week of the quarter. Approval of their advisor is required. They 
must follow the procedures established by the Registrar's Office. 



Incompletes 

The teacher may allow a student an extension of his course work 
for any given quarter up to the end of the fifth week of the next quar- 
ter. If the student does not finish his work by the end of the fifth 
week, the teacher will award him either an "F" (failure) or a "PI" 
(permanent incomplete, i.e. work no longer subject to completion). No 
credit will be given for a permanently incompleted course. Such a 
course may be repeated provided that the student registers and pays 
tuition according to the normal procedures of the school. 



Failures 

No credit will be given for a course in which a student received 
an F. If it is a required course, the student must successfully com- 
plete that course before graduation. 



Transfer of Credit 

No college course may be substituted for an upper division course 
at CTU. Graduate credits previously earned in theology may be trans- 
ferred toward the Master of Divinity degree, provided that the student 
has earned at least a "C" in those courses. These credits will be 
recognized only after the student successfully completes one year of 
academic work at CTU. 



Credit By Cross-Registration 

Graduate students enrolled at CTU may register for courses in 
any of the schools of the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 
(CCTS) and in the Center for Studies in Religious Education (CSRE) 
with the approval of their academic advisor and the Academic Dean. 



19 



Additional tuition and registration fees are not charged by the other 
Cluster schools. 

Credit for courses taken in other Cluster schools and the CSRE 
can be applied toward both elective and area course requirements of 
the CTU degree programs. Up to one third of the course requirements 
may be taken in other schools of the Cluster. By special arrangement 
this may be increased to one half. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



The Curriculum 



In keeping with the stated purpose and objectives of the Catholic 
Theological Union (see page 7) the curriculum is intended to provide 
the necessary professional preparation for those who wish to enter 
ordained ministry in the Roman Catholic Church and an appropriate 
graduate theological preparation for those who are interested in a va- 
riety of Christian ministries. Curriculum objectives are specified in 
each of the school's programs. 

Accordingly, the basic curriculum at CTU is structured around the 
first professional degree of Master of Divinity (M.Div.). The school 
also offers the academic degree of Master of Arts in Theology (M.A.) 
to those students who wish to qualify for it. These degree programs 
are not mutually exclusive. A number of other program options are also 
available to CTU students. Candidates for the M.Div. can prepare 
themselves for specialized forms of ministry by incorporating into 
their program the areas of concentration cooperatively offered by CTU 
and the schools of the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools. (Cf. 
CCTS Announcements 1975-1976.1 Jhe Program of Studies in the World 
Mission of the Church offers CTU students a number of program varia- 
tions. Studies in religious education are available in the Cluster 
schools and at the Center for Studies in Religious Education (CSRE). 
A series of offerings in Jewish Studies is funded by the Jewish 
Chautauqua Society. 

The course-model is the basic approach used for the theological 
content dimension of the curriculum. However, individual teachers are 
free to experiment with a variety of pedagogical methods and the major 
portion of the required curriculum is by area rather than by specific 
course. 

CTU envisions its programs of preparation for ministry in two 
distinct phases: (1) the First Year Program; and (2) graduate profes- 
sional preparation. 



20 



First Year Program (FYP) 

Purpose and Goals 

The First Year Program is a blend of formal theological study and 
guided ministerial experience which orientates the beginning student 
toward the professional goal of CTU. While the program is structured 
to facilitate entrance into the M.Div. program, it is easily adaptable 
to the needs of those who will enter the M.A. Program. 

The FYP has as its specific goals: to prepare the student for pro- 
fessional theological education on the graduate level; to introduce the 
student to professional theological education and to guided experience 
in ministry in the context of today's world; to help the student under- 
stand the inner connection between theology, ministry, and world; to 
help the student understand that the quality of theology and ministry 
depends on his holiness and wholeness. 

The FYP is under the direction of an inter-departmental team of 
coordinators, who also work with the first year students as theological 
reflectors. Since its introduction in 1970 the FYP has undergone con- 
tinuing evaluation and modification to meet the needs of entering stu- 
dents. 

Structure and Content 

' The theological dimension of the FYP includes course work in the 
areas of biblical, historical and systematic studies, which serves to 
introduce the student to the scriptures and to systematic theological 
reflection on the Christian heritage. The ministerial experience is 
provided by a pastoral work program which serves both as an introduc- 
tion to ministry and as the experiential base for theological study. 
Proper integration of these components is promoted by such things as 
quarterly intensives and reflection on the pastoral work with staff and 
faculty members. Thus the basic issues of theology and ministry are 
reflected upon as complementary and inter-acting. 

During orientation the student and his academic advisor work out 
the optional course sequences of his program in view of his back- 
ground and needs and the goals of the FYP. Six to eight students are 
grouped into a team for the pastoral work program. Each team is head- 
ed by a theological reflector. Team placement is made by the FYP 
coordinators after questionnaires and personal interview. The stu- 
dent's program is then approved by the FYP coordinating team and the 
Dean. 

The full FYP consists of 36 quarter hours of work. Previous work 
may be accepted as equivalent to all or part of the FYP. 



21 



The FYP Curriculum 

Fall Quarter: 

Old Testament Introduction 
Early Christianity 
Phenomenology of Religion 
Introduction to Theology 
Pastoral Work Program 

Winter Quarter: 

New Testament Introduction 

The Christianization of Europe 

The Problem of God and Contemporary Society 

Pastoral Care in the Church 

Pastoral Work Program 

Spring Quarter: 

The Bible: Its Formation and Interpretation 
Christianity in the Renaissance & Reformation 
Theology of the Church 
Introduction to Moral Theology 
Pastoral Work Program 

Courses in biblical, classical, and modern languages are also 
available during various quarters of the year. 

Master of Divinity (M. Div.) 

Purpose and Goals 

The Master of Divinity is the first professional degree and the fo- 
cus of CTU's academic program. The primary aim of the M.Div. Program 
is to prepare students to be effective ministers as described in the 
CTU statement of purpose and objectives (see page 7). Building on the 
First Year Program, the standard M.Div. Program (described below) com- 
bines an academic core of theological studies with a theoretical and 
practical study of the professional skills needed by the Roman Cath- 
olic priest. Students who so desire can attain a certain amount of spe- 
cialization within this program, especially by combining it with a pro- 
gram of mission studies or with the Cluster areas of concentration. 
The area requirements of this program can also be tailored to meet the 
needs of students looking to other than priestly ministry. 



22 



The curricular objectives of the M.Div. Program are specified in 
terms of three dimensions which CTU considers basic to a sound pro- 
fessional education for ministry. 

1. Theological Content. The student must achieve a thorough and crit- 
ical understanding of the Christian heritage. He must develop the ab- 
ility to interpret and apply it creatively within the context of present- 
day thought and culture. It has been the task of the several departments 
to single out those areas which the student should encounter and for 
which he will be held responsible. These areas are outlined below. 

2. Ministerial Skills. The student must acquire a set of skills appropri- 
ate for his future ministry. This process includes a number of inter- 
locking phases in which the student masters theory and techniques, 
engages in actual ministerial experience in a developing way under 
the guidance of a supervisor, and assumes increasing responsibility 
for perfecting his own professional skills. The skills to be aquired in- 
clude not only the traditional ones, such as preaching, pastoral coun- 
seling, administration of the sacraments, appropriate liturgical style, 
but also those called for in the relatively new possibilities for mission 
and ministry. 

3. integrative Education. The third dimension of professional prepara- 
tion for ministry at CTU is the difficult task of integration. The student 
is aided in this effort by such facets of the program as the interdis- 
ciplinary character of the FYP, the increasing number of team and inter- 
departmental courses, the comprehensive project or seminar required 
for the M.Div. degree, and especially the program of Field Education. 



Field Education 

It is the task of Field Education to bring the student's growing 
mastery of theological content and acquisition of ministerial skills into 
focus and personal integration in the act of effective ministry. Theory 
and skills of themselves do little for the minister unless in their ac- 
quisition they are integrated in such a way that they become part of 
the process of human growth. This presumes that the greatest resource 
of the ministry is a well integrated or developed personhood. 

The Director of Field Education at Catholic Theological Union is 
responsible for placing individual students in specific and expertly 
supervised action programs. The Department of Christian Mission and 
Ministry is responsible for providing opportunities for theological re- 



23 



flection growing out of such programs. A variety of placements for field 
education are available: parishes, schools, hospitals, correctional in- 
stitutions, the inner city, campus ministry, neighborhood organizations, 
catechetical and youth counselling programs. 

Each student enrolled in the Master of Divinity Program will be re- 
quired to spend eighteen quarter hours or the equivalent of two quar- 
ters in supervised field education programs. Two distinct types of 
field placement, subject to approval of the Director of Field Educa- 
tion, are required. Students are encouraged to enroll in a Clinical 
Pastoral Education program for one of the quarters. 

The effectiveness of a program in field education is due in large 
measure to careful supervision. Supervisors are chosen on the basis 
of their supervisory training or proven experience as ministerial edu- 
cators. An in-service training program is conducted for new supervis- 
ors. 

Pre-requi sites 

Candidates for the Master of Divinity must meet the general ad- 
mission requirements of the Catholic Theological Union. They must 
also have completed the CTU First Year Program or its equivalent. The 
equivalency will be judged by the appropriate department or officer. 

First year students who plan to enter the M.Div. Program are re- 
quired to take a total of 36 quarter hours chosen from the first year 
offerings. Of these, three courses (9 hours) are required in the Depart- 
ment of Biblical Literature and Languages: BLL 300, 305, 315; three 
courses (9 hours) are required in the Department of Historical and Doc- 
trinal Studies; and three quarters of the Pastoral Work Program are re- 
quired. Finally, six quarter hours of church history survey, which may 
be taken either in upper level college or in the FYP, are required for, 
entrance into upper level courses in the Department of Historical and 
Doctrinal Studies. 

Once the pre-requisites have been met, the M.Div. Program will 
usually take three years (at least 8 quarters). It must be completed 
within seven years. If there has been a prolonged interruption, the 
Dean may require a certain amount of residence as well. 



Language Requirements 

Language requirements are determined by each department for its 
course offerings. 



24 



Course Requirements 

A total of 99 quarter hours of graduate level work are required for 
the Master of Divinity, in which the candidate must maintain a "C" 
(2.0) average. Three of these hours represent the comprehensive re- 
quirement. The remaining hours are divided among the following requir- 
ed areas: 

A. Dept. of Biblical Literature & Languages (BLL) . . . . 18 hrs. 

Area Requirements: 

1 . Old Testament 9 hrs. 

Three areas: 

Pentateuch or Deuteronomic Corpus 

Prophets 

Wisdom Literature or Psalms 

2. New Testament 9 hrs. 

Three areas: 

Synoptics 
Johannine course 
Pauline course 

B. Dept. of Historical & Doctrinal Studies (HDS) .... 33 hrs. 

Area Requirements: 

1. History 3 hrs. 

Course in Modern or Contemporary History 

2. Systematics 30 hrs. 

a. Doctrinal areas 18 hrs. 

God* 

Creation & Eschatology 

Christ 
Church* 

Sacraments { two courses, one of which 
must be on Eucharist) 

b. Ethical areas 9 hrs. 

One course in foundational ethicst 

Two courses in ethical issues 

c. Law 3hrs. 

Theology of Law 



25 



C. Dept. of Christian Mission & Ministry (CMM) 30 hrs. 

Area Requirements: 

1. Sacramental Law 3 hrs. 

2. Pastoral Counseling 3 hrs. 

3. Preaching 3 hrs. 

4. Pastoral Mission 3 hrs. 

5. Field Education 18 hrs. 

D. Electives 15 hrs. 

TOTAL .. o ... = ............. 96 hrs. 

* Students who have taken the course on God or Church in the FYP may se- 

lect another doctrinal area as part of the required graduate hours. 

t Students who have taken foundational ethics in the FYP may select an- 

other area in ethics as part of the required 9 graduate hours. 

Up to one third of the course requirements, including both area 
and elective requirements, may be taken in other schools of the Chi- 
cago Cluster of Theological Schools. By special arrangement with the 
Dean this may be increased to one half. 

Comprehensive Requirement 

The candidate for the Master of Divinity degree must also give 
evidence of his ability to integrate his total educational experience 
into an operational totality. This is done in either of two ways. 

(1) A master's report or project demonstrating both integration of 
of theological knowledge and a creative response to some par- 
ticular problem of ministry. This is normally done under the 
guidance of a CTU faculty member. The project must be sub- 
mitted to the appropriate department for approval. 

(2) The successful completion of an inter-departmental integrating 
seminar. The objective of this seminar is not the imparting of 
new knowledge, but rather the articulation of the integration 
of knowledge and skills already acquired and their application 
to concrete problems of ministry. The student is evaluated on 
his ability to apply the totality of his professional education 
to the areas treated in the seminar. The seminar (M.Div. 598) 



26 



is directed by an inter-departmental team and will be offered 
in the Spring Quarter. 

Each of the above is equivalent to three quarter hours and students 
will be charged the normal fee for one course. 

Master of Arts in Theology (M.A.) 

Purpose and Goals 

The purpose of the CTU Program for the Master of Arts in Theology 
is multidimensional. The Program is designed, within the resources of 
CTU and the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, to provide the 
theological background for those who wish: to prepare for entrance into 
a doctoral program in theology; to teach religion at a secondary or col- 
lege level; to develop a basic competence in the area of theological 
studies though their principal specialization lies elsewhere. 

The M.A. Program is marked by flexibility, allowing for a wide 
variety of individually tailored programs. When he applies for admis- 
sion to the Program, normally by the middle of the quarter preceding 
admission, the candidate will choose the objective(s) which best meet 
his needs. Before registering for M.A. course work he will meet with 
his M.A. Board to work out the details of a program designed to help 
him achieve the objective(s) he has chosen. The M.A. Board will act as 
an on-going supervisory and consultative group which will help the 
student evaluate his progress and decide on any modifications which 
might be advisable. 

The M.A. in theology is not routinely granted en route to the M.Div. 
It is also open to those who wish to gain theological background for 
work other than the priestly ministry. 

Once the pre-requi sites have been met, the M.A. Program will us- 
ually take two years (one year of course work plus the time needed for 
the thesis and the comprehensive examinations). It must be completed 
within seven years. 

Pre-requisites 

Candidates for the M.A. in Theology must meet the general admis- 
sion requirements of Catholic Theological Union. They must also have 
completed one year {24 semester hours or 36 quarter hours) of univer- 



27 



Mlii^iii -'* *«» * :« •I'liP ' 



^^^&f 



'^ mmr 



.m*Jm :^^m 



?/ 



/t 



*»ftiiiii»i 



>«% 






sity or seminary level theology. This latter requirement can be fulfilled 
in the CTU First Year Program or by an undergraduate major in Theology 
or Religious Studies from an accredited college or university, provided 
that the Dean, in consultation with the M.A. Director and appropriate 
faculty members, judges this to be equivalent. To enter graduate level 
candidate must have taken BLL 300, 305, and 315 or their equivalent; 
to enter graduate courses in the Department of Historical and Doctrinal 
Studies he must have completed at least twelve quarter hours of his- 
torical and doctrinal studies, including six quarter hours of church 
history survey. 

Language Requirements 

A reading knowledge of one modern foreign language is required 
of all candidates for the M.A. degree. The choice will normally be lim- 
ited to French or German. In addition, those specializing in HDSwill 
normally be required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of Latin, and 
those specializing in BLL will be required to demonstrate a reading 
knowledge of Greek or Hebrew, or both, depending on the scope of the 
program. Language requirements shall normally be met by the end of 
the first quarter of the first year of the M.A. Program. 

Course Requirements 

Requirements include 36 quarter hours (12 courses) of course 
work. The candidate must maintain a "B" (3.00) average. There will 
be automatic dismissal from the Program for any grade below a "C" 
or for more than two "C's". The course work shall be divided as fol- 
lows: 

1. Eight upper division courses in the student's area of special- 
ization (e.g.. Scripture, Systematic Theology, Ethics, etc.) of 
which two courses are to be advanced seminars. . . 24 hours 

2. Two upper division courses in each of two other theological 
disclipines 12 hours 

Up to one-third of the courses may be taken in other schools of 
the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools. By special arrangement 
with the M.A. Board, this may be increased to one-half. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Part of the requirement for the M.A. in Theology is a two-part com- 
prehensive examination in which the candidate is to demonstrate his 



30 



grasp of theological methodologies and content of the disciplines in- 
cluded within the scope of his program. The content and approach for 
which he will be responsible in the comprehensives is determined by 
the student and his Board of Examiners within the general prescrip- 
tions of the M.A. Program. 

Dissertation 

As the final requirement for the M.A. in Theology, the candidate 
must demonstrate the ability to do competent work in his field by writ- 
ing a dissertation characterized by research and independent thought. 
This dissertation shall be seventy-five to one hundred pages in length 
and conform to one of the accepted manuals of style for this kind of 
work. The dissertation is equivalent to nine quarter hours. 

Further details of the M.A. Program can be obtained from the Di- 
rector, Fr. Roman Vanasse, 0. Praem. 



Program of Studies in World Mission (M. Div. or M.A.) 

The World Mission of the Church is at the threshold of a new era. 
The growing thrust toward unity on the economic and political planes, 
the deeper realization of cultural pluralism within that unity, and the 
greater involvement in the struggle for human dignity have all given 
new thrust and direction to the Church's mission in the world: to be 
truly servant to mankind, to be truly indigenous and catholic, to be 
truly a sign and instrument of man's unity with man and union with 
God. 

It is in this context that the Program of Studies in World Mission 
has developed at CTU. The goal is to prepare an apostle who i is a 
person of dialogue - who is able to live a precarious existence be- 
tween different cultural worlds; who seeks not only to give but to 
serve, not only to admonish but to assist; who calls to conversion but 
is also ready to undergo conversion; who, in inviting all peoples to 
the community of those who profess Jesus as the Christ, wants to en- 
able other churches and other religions to develop according to their 
best tendencies. 

CTU students who wish to focus their preparation for ministry on 
the world mission of the church have various program options. Basic 
to such a program is a concentrated quarter in Cross-Cultural Commun- 
ication of the Gospel offered cooperatively by CTU and the schools of 
the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools. This quarter, as a total 



31 



environment experience, gives the student an introduction into the 
complexities of cultural pluralism and unity in today's world and the 
challenge of communicating the Gospel in this context. (For further 
details of this quarter, see the CCTS Announcements 1975-76) 

The themes and experiences of this quarter are further developed 
and deepened through a wide range of courses, seminars and field ex- 
periences (cf. pp. 50-51 which can be tailored to meet the needs of the 
student in a non-degree program or to fulfill the requirements of either 
of two CTU degrees: 

I. Master of Arts in Theology with Mission Specialization. Pre- 
requisites and requirements are the same as those of the M.A. 
Program as described on pp . 27-31 . 

II. Master of Divinity with Mission Specialization. Pre-requisites 
and requirements are the same as those of the M.Div. Program 
as described on pp. 24-27 with the following course modifica- 
tions: 

A. Department of Biblical Literature and Languages 

Of the 18 hours of Biblical requirements, 3 must be in a 
course with mission specialization. 

B. Department of Historical and Doctrinal Studies 

1. History 

The 3 hour History requirement is to be a course with 
mission specialization. 

2. Systematics 

a. Of the 18 hours of Doctrinal requirements, 12 are 
to be in courses with mission specialization. 

b. Of the 9 hours of Ethical requirements, 6 are to be 
in courses with mission specialization. 

c. The Law requirement remains. 

C. Department of Christian Mission and Ministry 

1. Of the 18 hours of Field Education, 9 hours are to be 
taken in the Intensive Unit I of the Cross-Cultural Com- 
munication concentration. 

2. Of the remaining 12 required hours, 6 are to be in 
courses with mission specialization. 

The Program of Studies in World Mission is carried out in coopera- 
tion with the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools which guarantees 
a broad theological and ecumenical environment. Included in this di- 



32 



mension is the participation in planning and sponsoring of various 
workshops and meetings on current mission and international prob- 
lems as well as the annual one-week Institute for Missionaries. 

The Program is open to — and has been enriched by — mission- 
aries on leave who participate in the various courses according to 
their individual interests and needs, as part of their continuing educa- 
tion. 

A complete list of courses offered in the Program will be found on 
pages 50-51 of this catalogue. 

Center for Studies in Religious Education 

The Center is an educational organization which offers both 
courses and clinical programs in the area of religious education, under 
the direction of Fr. Eugene Mainelli, O.P. (Cf. CCJS Announcements). 

CTU students wishing to include religious education in their prep- 
aration for ministry are encouraged to register for work at the Center. 

Women's Studies 

Beginning in 1974, CTU has actively recruited women for its pro- 
grams. The school is convinced that women will be increasingly active 
in the pastoral life of the Church. They should be given every oppor- 
tunity for the very best training in theology, scripture and pastoral 
studies. Moreover, CTU realizes that women bring a valuable dimen- 
sion of insight and experience to the theological enterprise. All pro- 
grams at CTU are open to women. A special certificate is given to 
those who complete a year's work in pastoral studies. At present 
about twenty women are studying at CTU. 

Overseas Study Programs 

Two options for study programs abroad are currently offered CTU 
students: 

1. By special arrangement with the theology faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Louvain, CTU students may spend one or two semes- 
ters at the University as part of their CTU program. A regular- 
ized admissions procedure has been established. 

2. A study-travel seminar is conducted each summer in Italy. It 
consists of on-site study of church life and Franciscan spiritu- 
ality and its sources. Fr. Damien Isabell, O.F.M., assistant 
professor of spiritual theology, directs the seminar. 



33 



CHICAGO CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

Catholic Theological Union is a charter member of the Chicago 
Cluster of Theological Schools, an ecumenical association of nine 
Protestant and Catholic seminaries whose purpose is to promote qual- 
ity theological education through a programed sharing of resources. 

After a period of informal cooperation which began in 1969, the 
Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools was formed in May, 1970. Six 
of the Cluster schools are located in Hyde Park: Catholic Theological 
Union, Chicago Theological Seminary, Jesuit School of Theology, Luth- 
eran School of Theology, Meadvi He/Lombard Theological School, and 
McCormick Theological Seminary. Three schools are in the western 
suburbs: Bethany and Northern Baptist in Oak Brook, and DeAndreis 
in Lemont. 

The participating schools maintain educational autonomy and con- 
tinue to offer their own degrees, both professional and academic. Each 
school also preserves its confessional identity and theological tradi- 
tions. CTU participation in the Cluster follows the guidelines set 
down by the Secretariat for Promoting Christian Unity in the Ecumeni- 
cal Directory, Part II, and by the National Conference of Catholic 
Bishops in the Program of Priestly Formation, #253-288. Graduate stu- 
dents at CTU may register in courses offered in the Cluster with the 
approval of their academic advisor and the Academic Dean. 

The Cluster is directed by a full-time coordinator, with staff as- 
sistants for academics and library. 

The Cluster enriches the theological potential of the member 
schools in many ways: 

1) A student enrolled in any Cluster school may take courses in 
any other Cluster school without additional tuition or registra- 
tion fees. During the 1974-75 school year, students cross- 
registered for 736 courses. 

2) Reciprocal library privileges and services to all Cluster stu- 
dents and faculty. 

3) Cluster Areas of Concentration. Five areas of cooperative in- 
struction focusing on broad types of ministerial function: per- 
sonal transformation, social transformation, cross-cultural com- 
munication, celebration, and interpretation. Each program of 
concentration comprises three elements: theological input, 
field placement, and an integrative structure. Each is conducted 
by an inter-disciplinary, inter-school staff. See CCTS Announce- 
ments. 



34 



4) Cluster Programs of Cooperative Instruction. Team-taught 
courses by professors of two or more schools are offered in 
various areas of theological and ministerial studies. These 
courses are listed in the current CCTS Announcements. 
The Chicago Cluster is a prime exam'ple of ecumenical under- 
standing and cooperation. A large area of theological studies is of 
common interest and is confess iona I ly not sensitive. In many courses, 
professors of all denominations use the same basic sources and meth- 
odology. In addition, there are questions of current interest to all con- 
fessions, and the contributions of modern theologians often cut across 
confessional lines. Cluster experience has shown that students be- 
come more appreciative of their own confessional identity and pro- 
fessors do not proselytize in any way. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Catholic Theological Union is located near the campus of the 
University of Chicago. This is one of the great research institutions 
in the world. The Divinity School is renowned for historical research 
and the preparation of teaching scholars. A special plan of bi-registra- 
tion permits CTU students to register for courses in the University at 
a substantial reduction of tuition. Two courses may be taken in any 
one quarter, one in the Divinity School, the other in any graduate or 
professional school of the University. In addition, the many public 
leotures and cultural events sponsored by the University are open to 
CTU students. In the fall of 1974 the University, Catholic Theological 
Union and the Jesuit School of Theology co-sponsored a month-long 
Celebration of the Medieval Heritage, which brought to Chicago emi- 
nent scholars from Europe, Canada and the United States. 

Courses of Study 

Courses offered during the academic year 1975-1S76 are listed be- 
low. Three departments make up the school of theology of the Catholic 
Theological Union: The Department of Biblical Literature and Lan- 
guages; the Department of Historical and Doctrinal Studies; and the 
Department of Christian Mission and Ministry. The courses are divided 
into three series: "300" series (courses preparatory to graduate work 
at either the M.A. or M.Div. level); "400" series (graduate level 
courses representing generally the core courses for the M.Div. de- 
gree); "500" series (graduate level seminars developing special ques- 
tions in biblical, traditional and contemporary theology). 

All courses are three quarter-hour courses, that is, classes are 
scheduled 150 minutes per week for ten weeks. The eleventh week is 
evaluation week. 

35 



A. Department of Biblical Literature and Languages (BLL) 

Staff: Thomas Fox, Robert Karris (Chairman), Callistus Langerholz, Hayim G, 
Perelmuter, Donald Senior, Alphonse Spilly, Carroll Stuhlmueller. 

BLL 300: Old Testament: Introduction 

Select passages from the books and major traditions of the entire Old Testa- 
ment will be studied against the background of Israel's history, religion and 
literary genres. The primary goal of this course is a controlled knowledge of 
the Old Testament in preparation for future in-depth study of individual sec- 
tions. Yearly. Spilly (Sec. 1 ) 

Stuhlmueller (Sec. 2) 
(Fall) 

BLL 305: New Testament: Introduction 

The writings of the New Testament will be presented in their historical, cul- 
tural, religious and sociological context in the Greco-Roman world. Introduc- 
tion to the methodological tools employed in New Testament research and to 
the diverse theologies that comprise the New Testament witness to Jesus of 
Nazareth. Yearly. Karris (Sec. 1) 

Senior (Sec. 2) 
(Winter) 

BLL 315: The Bible: Its Formation and Interpretation 

The formation of the Bible in terms of the "word" and its revelation of God's 
presence as Savior within the community of faith. The emergence of a sacred 
tradition of holy writ, interpreted anew by and for each generation. Topics of 
special study include: biblical inspiration and inerrancy; revelation, scripture 
and tradition; liturgy and the scriptures; the senses of scripture; Canon; texts 
and versions; textual criticism. Yearly. Stuhlmueller and Senior 

(Spring) 
BLL 320: Biblical Greek 

This course is designed to meet the needs of students who have little or no 
knowledge of Biblical Greek. Yearly. Karris 

(Fall) 
BLL Z2,^\ Intermediate Greek 

BLL 325: introductory Hebrew 

An introductory course for those who have not previously studied Hebrew. 
Yearly. Fox 

(Winter) 

BLL 326: intermediate Hebrew 

BLL 400: Historical Exegetical Study of the Pentateuch 

Historical-archaeological outline of 2nd miilenium B.C. Patriarchal traditions 
viewed in the context of their literary origins. Exodus event as central to the 
understanding of the O.T. Term paper or equivalent project. Fox 

(Spring) 

BLL 405: The Deuteronomic History 

Deuteronomy and the deuteronomic history. From the "conquest" to the end 
of the kingdoms, stressing the deuteronomic theology of history in the major 
events of the period. Spilly 

(Fall) 

36 



BLL 4 1 : Pre-Ex ilic Prophe c y 

The origin of the "classical" or "writing" Prophets in the unique genius of 
Mosaic Religion and in the early prophetic guilds. An exegesis of key pas- 
sages in Amos, Hosea, and Jeremiah, to appreciate their particular contribu- 
tion to the biblical religion then and now. 1976-1977. Stuhlmueller 

BLL 415: Evolving Form of Prophet ism During the Exile and Post-Exilic Periods 

The salient role of Ezekiel and Deutero-lsaiah during the pivotal period of the 
exile. Later subservience of the prophetic movement to priestly legalism or 
to the apocalyptic form of postexilic Judaism. The study will be undertaken 
by means of key texts within the prophets. Stuhlmueller 

(Winter) 
BLL 420: The Psalms 

An intelligent and prayerful appreciation of the psalms will be sought by 
investigating their literary formation and their religious-liturgical usage in 
Israel. Select psalms will be studied from each literary or liturgical category, 
chosen for their importance to Israel, the New Testament or the theological- 
pastoral issues today. Stuhlmueller 



BLL 425: Old Testament Wisdom Literature 



(Spring) 



Perenial themes: e.g., creation, suffering, birth-death; and attitudes: e.g. 
toward poverty, optimism, humanism, God — as exemplified in the wisdom 
movement in Israel. Particular attention to the expression of these topics in* 
Job, Proverbs, Qohelet, Sirach, and Wisdom. Term paper or equivalent pro- 
ject. Fox 

(Winter) 
BLL 430: The Gospel According to Matthew 

Within the structure and the purpose of the Gospel, Matthew will be studied 
as a /Pastor in his community in applying Jesus' teaching to his own situa- 
tion. Langerholz 

(Fall) 
BLL 432: The Gospel According to Mark 

The course will consist in a studied reading of Mark's Gospel in the light of 
form and redaction criticism. Particular attention will be given to the evan- 
gelist's insistence on the link between Christian discipleship and the Pas- 
sion of Jesus. 1976-1977. Senior 

BLL 435: The Gospel According to Luke 

Introduction to form and redaction criticism. Exegesis of the entire gospel 
with special reference to the most recent and the most significant redaction 
critical studies. Luke's place in the theologies of the Early Church. 

Karris 
^ (Spring) 

BLL 440: The Gospel According to John 

A critical-exegetical approach to John's text to arrive at his sources and to 
evaluate his theology, particularly on the mission of the Son and the Church. 

^®^'''^' Langerholz (Winter) 

Karris (Sprinq) 
BLL 450: Pauline Theology 

Origin and development of main Pauline themes in the light of Paul's experi- 
ence as well as the theological and cultural traditions and theological dis- 
putes of his time. Implications for ministry. Spilly 

(Winter) 
37 



BLL 455: Pauline Exegesis 

Methodology used in the exegesis of a Pauline epistle. Paul's theological 
and cultural milieu. Detailed exegesis of the entire epistle. The epistles 
treated differ from year to year. Offered 1975-1976: 1-2 Thessalonians, Philip- 
plans, Galatians. Karris 

ntt At^f\ (Fall) 

dLL 460: The Acts of the Apostles 

The distinctive theology of this second part of Luke-Acts will be investigated 
by the study of the methods of historical writing in antiquity, by the study 
of the speeches, and by the exegesis of other key passages. The question of 
using Acts as a source for the life and theology of Paul will also be dis- 
cussed. Karris 

BLL 490: Biblical Foundations of Mission 

The attitude of the Bible towards the outside world will be investigated for 
direction in the world mission of the Church today. In the Old Testament 
special attention will be devoted to the cultural and moral interdependency of 
Israel with the nations as well as to such motiffs as election, universal ism 
of salvation and monotheism. New Testament study will focus on the mission- 
ary discourses of the Gospels, and examine the practical challenges to the 
Church's mission as reflected in Acts and the epistles. Yearly. 

Senior and Stuhlmueller 

(Fall) 
BLL 518: Jewish Literature of the Hasmonean and Roman Periods 

Historico-cultural-religious developments of the period. Jewish apocalyptic 

and its influence on the religious thought of the Jews. Implications for New 

Testament study. Study of selected themes. Spilly 

(Winter) 

BLL 520: Liturgy of the Synagogue: I 

The tri-partite course on the Liturgy of the Synagogue— over a two year period- 
surveys worship forms in the contemporary American Synagogue with special 
reference to the common thread and variations in the Jewish denominations: 
Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform. This first section deals with the weekly 
synagogue service. Perelmuter 

(Spring) 
BLL 521 : Liturgy of the Synagogue: II 

The Liturgy of the High Holy Days: Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur. (Text: Agnon, 
Days of Awe [y>hockerr\ ) 1976-1977 Perelmuter 

BLL 522: Liturgy of the Synagogue: III 

Liturgy of the pilgrim festivals: Passover, Shabu'ot (Pentecost). Sukkoth. 
1976-1977. Perelmuter 

BLL 524: Readings in Rabbinic Literature 

Texts to be selected. Perelmuter 

(Spring) 
BLL 526: Rabbinic Judaism and the Early Church 

An examination of the nature of Rabbinic Judaism out of which Christianity 
emerged and with which Christianity co-existed over the centuries. An effort 
at achieving an insight into the approach and the mind of Rabbinic Judaism 
through an examination of the pertinent literature. Perelmuter 

(Fall) 

38 



BLL 529: Jewish Mysticism and Mess ian/'sm 

With special reference to Sabbatai Sevi. A close examination of the mystical 
substratum of Jewish historical and religious experience through a study in 
depth of the Sabbatian movement of the 17th century. This course will trace 
the stream of mystical thought and experience from the Talmudic period, 
medieval mysticism and the culmination in Lurianic Kabbala and the emer- 
gence of the Sabbatian movement in the mid-seventeenth century. 

Per e /muter 
(Fall) 

BLL 532: Faith and Suffering: The Gospel Accounts of the Death of Jesus 

This seminar will examine the four gospel accounts of the death of Jesus, 
seeking to appreciate how each gospel community was able to reflect on the 
death of Jesus in the light of its traditions and faith experience. Participants 
in the seminar will be invited to use the skills of form and redaction critic- 
ism to analyze the gospel texts, and to evaluate their potential for contem- 
porary proclamation. Senior 

(Spring) 

BLL 535: The Resurrection Texts in the Gospels and St. Paul 

The biblical background of the theme of resurrection. The hermeneutic of the 
empty tomb and apparitions. Langerholz 

(Spring) 
BLL 570: The Phenomenon of Early Catholicism in the New Testament 

I and II Peter, the Pastorals, Luke-Acts will be investigated from the view- 
point of what Ernst Kasemann and others call "Early Catholicism," The theo- 
logical tendencies of these New Testament books will be analyzed to see 
whether or to what extent they are "Early Catholic," i.e., stress moral ization 
of the faith, hierarchical organization, fides quae creditur, etc. The problem 
of theological diversity in the New Testament, Karris 

BLL 573; Baptism, Creed, and Christology in the New Testament 

This course will focus on those New Testament baptismal texts which are not 
emphasized in the "classical" approach to baptism in the New Testament. 
Areas to be treated: methodology needed to uncover and evaluate these texts; 
function of baptismal creeds and Christologies; relationship of baptism to 
ethics. Some of the texts to be discussed: 1 Peter, Apocalypse, Ephesians, 
Colossians, Karris 

BLL 597: independent Study 

Content and structure by arrangement, 

BLL 599: M.A. Seminar 

B. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES (HDS) 

Staff: Eugene Ahner, Dismas Bonner, Francis Dorff, Zachary Hayes (Chair- 
man), James Heisig, Damien Isabel I, Richard Leiiaert, Sebastian Mac- 
Donald, Lawrence Nemer, Gilbert Ostdiek, John Pawlikowski, Robert 
Schreiter, Roman Vanasse (Sabbatical). 



39 



HDS 300: Early Christianity 

The development of Christian doctrine and practice to 450 A.D. Topics will 
include: methods of interpreting scripture, the development of Trinitarian doc- 
trine, the understanding of the redemptive work of Christ, the growth of 
Church structures and sacramental practice. Lecture with assigned readings 
and reports or major papers. Burns 

(Fall) 
HDS 307: The Christianization of Europe 

A study of the Church's encounter with the Barbarian nations, of their con- 
version, and of the development of Christian life. An analysis of how the 
task affected Church life and thought, and of how the Church affected the 
world. Major consideration will be given to: Medieval Missions; Charlemagne; 
the Papal States; the Schism between East and West; and the development 
and experience of a Christian European Culture (theology, philosophy, social 
and political structures). Nemer 

(Winter) 

HDS 310: Christianity in the Renaissance and Reformation 

Factors influencing the breakdown of the medieval synthesis. Renaissance 
thought and style chiefly in relationship to the Church. Writings of the Re- 
formers, and the position of Trent. 1975-1976. Nemer 

(Spring) 

HDS 320: Phenomenology of Religion 

The course will first attempt to isolate some of the elements common to all 
religions, and their relationship to social structures. From this perspective, 
the phenomenon of civil religion will be examined, especially as it is mani- 
fested in recent and contemporary attitudes in American politics and diplo- 
macy. Yearly. Schreiter 

(Fall) 

HDS 325: introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and methods of theology worked out 
from a study of several case-histories. Special emphasis on the historical 
revelation in Christianity and the developing awareness of the faith-commu- 
nity in relation to shifting horizons. Yearly. Hayes 

(Fall) 

HDS 330: The Problem of God and Contemporary Society 

An analysis of why God has become problematic for contemporary man is fol- 
lowed by a critical review of representative Christian attempts to respond to 
this problem. The course seeks to help the student evaluate his own religious 
experience and respond intelligently to modern man's problem of God. Yearly. 

Hayes 
(Winter) 

HDS 345:Theology of the Church 

A study of the origins of the Church; the relation of the Kingdom to the 
Church; the basic images and themes in Scripture and tradition; the develop- 
ment of ecclesiastical office; and the relation of the Church to the world. 
Yearly. Ahner 

(Spring) 



40 



HDS 370: Introduction to Moral Theology 

This course is intended for students who have had no systematic approach to 
moral theology. The stress here will be on the basic principles guiding human 
action and attitude, in so far as they are compatible with the essentials of 
Christian tradition and suitable for facilitating conscience formation and de- 
cision-making, in the face of modern conflicts and problems. Donahey 

nD5 'kSjXji Studies in Comparative Religion 

A guided reading and discussion course for those students wanting a general 
background in one or more religions, and for those students wishing an "n- 
depth study of a particular religious tradition. Some emphasis will be placed 
upon confronting one's own tradition with those traditions studied. Schreiter 

(Fall) 

HDS ^^3'. Correlating Christian Theology and Social Sciences 

A careful examination and evaluation of the possible mutual interaction be- 
tween the social sciences and Christian theology using illustrations from 
indigenous developments among Afro-Americans and depicting through such 
an analysis how the social disciplines can make a contribution to the princi- 
ples of Christian theology. Special attention given to equipping persons with 
principles of methodological rationality for the correlation process. Readings, 
discussions, lectures, projects. (- TEC 413), Rero 

(Winter) 
HDS 422: 19th Century Imperialism and World Mission 

A study of the Church as it encounters the new world born of the French Re- 
volution, of how it affects and is affected by social and political considera- 
tions, of imperialism (Church and State), and of the missionary expansion in 
the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Major considerations will be given to: 
the Church's encounter with French and Italian political liberalism, with 
German philosophical and theological liberalism, with English scientific and 
political liberalism; the Church's response in the Syllabus of Errors and Vati- 
can I; Europe in Asia and Africa; Mission as Structure; the hesitant growth of 
local Churches; a western Christianity in a non-western world, Nemer 

(Winter) 
HDS 430: The Problem of God 

A detailed study of the meaning of Christian theistic faith in the light of the 
problems raised by contemporary atheism and scientific developments. 

HDS 432: The Problem of God and Other Religions 

After an introductory review of how Western Christianity attempts to respond 
to contemporary rrian's problem of God, (especially with "the transcendental 
method"), this course studies the responses offered by Eastern religions, 
especially Buddhism and Hinduism, How different are the Christian and Non- 
Christian responses? Where are the points of consensus? What can both sides 
learn from each other? 

HDS 435: Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning the origins of man, the world and 
evil; a correlative investigation of finality and eschatological symbolism. 
Yearly, Hayes (Spring) 



41 



HDS 436: Eschatology and Eschatologies 

A comparison of central themes in Christian eschatology — apocalyptic crisis 
literature, death, final completion of the individual and the world — with 
eschatological views in selected non-Christian religious literature. The com- 
parison will be directed toward a better understanding of eschatological 
symbols and symbolic systems in both Christian and other cultural situa- 
tions. Schreiter 

(Winter) 

HDS 440: Christology 

A critical review of Scriptural and traditional interpretations of Incarnation 
and Salvation in an effort to arrive at an articulation of what Jesus Christ 
and redemption mean for contemporary man. Hayes (Fall) 

Schrieter (Winter) 

HDS 445: Theology of the Church 

A study of the origins of the Church; the relation of the Kingdom to the 
Church; the basic images and themes in Scripture and tradition; the develop- 
ment of ecclesiastical office; and the relation of the Church to the world. 

Ahner 

HDS 446: The Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

In the light of the contemporary questioning of "the missions," this course 
will try to determine why the Church by her very nature must be missionary, 
what this mission means, how "necessary" it is in the plan of salvation, and 
how it is to be carried out in our modern, post-colonial world. Ahner 

(Fall) 

HDS 447: Church and Structure: Theology of Law 

A study of ecclesiological thought and attempts to concretize the theory, 
particularly in legal structures. The course involves historical survey, as 
well as examination of the contemporary tensions between theory and struc- 
ture. Treats theory and practical problems of interpretation of law in the con- 
temporary Church. Yearly. Bonner (Fall) 

HDS 450: Theology of the Eucharist 

A study of the scriptural origins and historical development of the eucharis- 
tic liturgy, with particular emphasis on the eucharistic prayer. Theological 
reflection on the meaning of eucharist in light of the above and of contempo- 
rary discussion. Consideration of current questions, e.g., ecumenical ques- 
tions of intercommunion and eucharistic ministry. Yearly. Ostdiek (Fall) 

Dorff (Winter) 

HDS 453: Myths, Signs, Symbols, Sacraments 

The course is intended to provide the student with a foundation for the doc- 
trinal study of the sacraments. Cross-cultural and interdisciplinary in per- 
spective, it will examine various sacramental motifs both phenomenologically 
and comparatively. Heisig 

(Spring) 



42 



HDS 455: Sacraments of Initiation 

General introduction to sacramental theology. Historical development of the 
rites and theology of Christian initiation. Current questions concerning the 
theology, catechesis, and celebration of the sacraments of initiation. Yearly. 

Dorff 
(Fall) 

HDS 460: Sacraments of Penance. Anointing, Orders 

The origins and historical development of penance, anointing, ordination. 
Questions of contemporary theological significance and celebration of these 
sacraments. Yearly, Ostdiek 

(Spring) 

HDS 466: Christian Attitudes Towards World Religions 

As Christians, can — or must — we acknowledge that man can experience and 
salvifically encounter God in other religions? An introductory analysis of the 
present-day encounter of religions is followed by an examination of recent 
Protestant and Catholic attempts at a "theology of the religions". The course 
seeks to provide the attitudes necessary for open dialogue with men of other 
faiths. 

HDS 481 : Moral Aspects of Human Sexuality 

A study of human love and sexuality from a psychological and Christian per- 
spective which aims to build a positive attitude toward and approach to the 
meaning of human sexuality. Special consideration will be given to the prob- 
lems of masturbation, homosexuality, and extra-martial intercourse. 

Lohkamp 
(Winter) 



HDS 4S2: Mora I Problems: Life 

A study of basic problems concerning human life: the sanctity of human life, 
abortion, transplant, experimentation, sterilization, and genetic manipula- 
tion, Lohkamp 

(Winter) 

HDS 485: Sin and Guilt 

This will be a study of sin and guilt, partly in seminar style, with emphasis 
on the moral and pastoral issues involved. Nevertheless, various other dis- 
ciplines (scripture, psychology, etc) will be called upon for input. The main 
purpose of this study is to disengage the presence and shape of sin in our 
society today, and to fashion a corresponding pastoral response to the find- 
ings that emerge. To accomplish this, the past tradition on the meaning and 
effects of sin will be explored, as well as modern studies, such as those 
that analyze the experience of guilt. The student will be expected to develop 
a position that respects the heart of the tradition, while speaking relevantly 
to the modern experience. Mac Dona Id 

(Fall) 



HDS 490-493: Development of Christian Spirituality I- IV 



Isabel I 



43 



HDS 495: Religious Experience, Spirituality, Spiritual Growth 

This course explores how some important spiritual writers of the Roman 
Catholic and Baptist traditions deal with man's relationship with God and 
how one can arrive at a deeper experience of God. Religious experience will 
be explored starting from C. Meyer's The Touch of God. "Holiness" and 
"progress" will be studied in the light of personal growth, especially from 
the notion of the symbolic as outlined in C.A. Bernard, Initiation au language 
symbolique. Requirements: comparison between traditional and contemporary 
work on spirituality; study journal or major paper and project. (- CCTS 495). 

Isabel I and Buzzard 
(Winter) 
HDS 505: Constructing Local Theologies 

A seminar geared to investigating how Christian theological themes are 
developed in varying situations, particularly those not part of main-stream 
Western culture. Students will be asked to choose a certain situation (e.g.. 
Latino, Black, African, Japanese) and engage in reconstructing some theo- 
logical themes based upon their own background in the Western Christian 
tradition and on experience or guided reading in the particular cultural situa- 
tion. Schreiter 

(Spring) 

HDS 515: Art of Christian Celebration 

A study of the nature of ritual and the laws of ritual development. Analysis 
of the constitutive elements of rite (sign and symbol, language, gesture, mu- 
sic, dance) and their relationship to the ministerial role in' celebration. A 
consideration of certain problems and developments in liturgical experimen- 
tation. Dorff 

(Spring) 

HDS 516: The Liturgical Year 

A study of the origins and evolution of the liturgical calendar with a view 
toward the preparation of contemporary celebrations of Christian seasons and 
feasts. 

HDS 520: Theology of Karl Rahner 

A study of the philosophical orientation of Rahner and its implications in his 
theological writings. Hayes 

(Winter) 
HDS 566: Christology of St. Bonaventure 

A study of the Bonaventurian style of Christology, developing the relation 
between Christology, Trinitarian theology, and the theology of man. The 
course will work from several Christological sermons and relate these to 
Bonaventure's larger works. Requirement for admission: HDS 440 or equiva- 
lent. 1976-1977. Hayes 

HDS 570: Theology of Revolution 

An examination of various definitions of revolution as they have emerged in 
the classical Western revolutions. An extended look at current revolutionary 
theology as it has emerged from Latin American sources. Course require- 
ments: participation in class discussions; take-home exam or term paper of 
about 20 pages. 1976-1977. Pawlikowski 



44 



HDS S77'. American Theology and United States Foreign Policy 

In this bicentennial year the course will focus on the influence of theological 
conceptions in early America in the development of United States foreign 
policy. There will be a brief overview of recent American foreign policy per- 
spectives and how they might be understood from a theological viewpoint. 
Finally the course will consider what directions US foreign policy should 
take in this post-Vietnam era in light of ethical principles. One aspect of 
this will be a discussion of foreign aid mechanisms. Course requirement: 
participation in class discussions; take-home exam or term paper of about 20 
P^9®S' Pawlikowski 

(Spring) 

HDS 580: The Theology and Ethics of Christian Marriage 

This is an interdisciplinary study offering an overview of marriage in terms 
of its rich Christian tradition (Scripture, the Fathers and liturgical rites) and 
also attempting to systematize this material in view of reaching ethical de- 
cisions that are sensitive to such modern problems as divorce, contraception 
and new styles of marital relationship. 1976-1977. MacDonald 



HDS 584: Moral Issues in Economics and Business 

A brief introduction into modern economic theories; the relationship between 
Christianity and the origins of modern capitalism; a Christian critique of 
capitalism; the Corporate Responsibility movement. Approximately one-half 
of the course will be devoted to case studies of typical problems confronting 
businessmen today with a view to attaining group consensus about the just 
solutions to these issues. Requirements: preparation of case study materials; 
participation in class discussion; take-home exam or term paper of about 20 
pages. MacDonald and Pawlikowski 

(Winter) 



HDS 585: Psychology and Moral Theology 

This seminar seeks to trace the influence that psychology (here understood 
broadly, to include all the disciplines that study, measure, control and treat 
human behavior) has exerted upon ethics and moral theology (the normative 
disciplines), and also upon popular mores, codes and standards. Problems 
that have arisen between them in the relatively short history of their inter- 
action will be noted, as well as their attempted solutions. These solutions 
will be evaluated from the viewpoint of moral theology. Major requirements: 
responsibility for sample readings; a project that clearly spells out a posi- 
tion on the relationship between psychology and moral theology; and partici- 
pation in group programs. MacDonald 

(Fall) 



45 



HDS 589: Special Questions: The l\/loral Theology of Charles Curran 

This is a specialized study of a significant American Catiiolic moral theo- 
logian, whose purpose is to appreciate his understanding of moral theology 
in the contemporary world. To achieve this, his thought will be traced through 
a chronological study of his major writings, with the focus on the issues he 
confronts, the principles he uses, the sources he draws upon, the consistency 
of his method, and the change and adaptation of position he has made. Main 
requirements: reading of his major writings; project that seeks to measure 
and evaluate his influence on moral theology and to evaluate his contribu- 
tion to this discipline. 

Mac Dona Id 
(Spring) 



HDS 597: Independent Study 
Content and structure by arrangement. 

HDS 599: M. A. Seminar 

Open to M.A. candidates only. The content of the seminar may vary according 
to the needs of the candidates, but some emphasis will usually be placed on 
exposure to and use of various theological methodologies, phenomenological, 
historical, transcendental, etc. Yearly. Ahner 

(Winter) 

C. DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN MISSION AND MINISTRY (CMM) 

Staff: John Boberg (Chairman), Dismas Bonner, Lois Dideon, Dennis Geaney, 
James Heisig, Damien Isabel I, Eugene Mainelli, Robert Mallonee, Thomas 
More Newbold. 

CMM 330: Pastoral Care in the Church 

Basic history, theology, dynamics and techniques of pastoral care with em- 
phasis placed on the role of the minister in his/her encounter with people. 
Topics to be considered: pastoral care in historical and theological perspec- 
tive; the minister's self-image and his/her capacity to care; the minister as 
professing professional; basic principles of pastoral care; special areas of 
pastoral concern during normal development and times of crisis. The purpose 
of this course is to introduce the student to the discipline of pastoral care 
and to set a broad foundation from which the student can move on to more 
specialized courses. Mallonee 

(Winter) 

CMM 380-385-390: Pastoral Work Program 

The pastoral work program provides guided exposure to the social and ec- 
clesiastical scene in Chicago through direct experience of select ministerial 
activity. Reflection on this experience is correlated with course work being 
taken. Six to eight students are grouped into a team headed by a theological 
reflector. staff 

(Fall, Winter, Spring) 



46 



CMM 400: The Sources of Pastoral Psychology 

This course in neither an introduction to bibliography nor a survey, but an 
exercise in the reading of and working with the principal sources of pastoral 
psychology, as found in Freud, Jung, and the originators of the more contem- 
porary human potential movement. Yearly. Newbold 

(Spring) 



CMM 405; Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

A discussion of the basic types of pastoral counseling in terms of goals, 
techniques and practices. A presentation and discussion of some typical 
situations in pastoral care. Yearly. Mallonee (Fall) 

Newbold (Winter) 



CMM 406: Practicum in Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

A prerequisite for this offering is CMM 405, or equivalent. The course is a 
practicum; with emphasis in the practicum on reality practice role-play, rela- 
tive to specific types of pastoral counseling situations. Followup is offered 
in the form of evaluation sessions. Verbatim reports will also be required, 
and evaluation will be given in both individual and group sessions. Yearly. 

Newbold 
(Spring) 



CMM A^O; Ministering to Spiritual Growth 

This course presupposes HDS 495 or its equivalent. How can a person help 
another in developing a relationship with God? This question will be explored 
historically with special emphasis on the desert fathers, John of the Cross 
and Francis de Sales. A theoretical section will provide the student with 
diagnostic tools useful in direction, and a technical part will explore tech- 
niques and their meaning in Christian growth. Requirements: one historical 
book, W. Kraft, The Search for the Holy, J. Laplace, The Direction of Con- 
science, a traditional manual and a final project, usually an interview with 
someone in the field. Yearly, Isabell 

(Spring) 



CMM 4^0: Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey of present canonical prescriptions, cone i liar norms and current 
practical application of legislation regarding the administration and reception 
of the sacraments. Particular emphasis on matrimonial law and practice. 
Yearly. Bonner (Fall) 

Bonner (Spring) 



47 



CMM 440: Christianity in World History: the Question of Prophecy Today 

To provide a basis for discussion this seminar will first scrutinize Arend Th. 
Van Leeuwen's hypothesis on the development of Western civilization and its 
consequences for the contemporary mission of the Church. Once this theory 
is understood and critiqued, the course will -examine how Old Testament 
prophecy relates to a prophetic stance in today's world. Particular attention 
will be given to the question: is the "prophet" today a maker of history or a 
witness to transcendence? Boberg and Fox 

(Fall) 



CMM 445: Missionary Catechetics 

The nature and place of catechesis in the mission of the Church; the end and 
tasks of catechesis in relation to pre-evangelization and evangelization; the 
theological and anthropological basis of a catechetical pedagogy, with spe- 
cial emphasis on a cross-cultural situation. 1976-1977. Boberg 



CMM 450: Practicum in Preaching 

A workshop style criticism of written and delivered sermons. Individual crit- 
icism and practice using video-tape equipment. Yearly. staff 

(Winter and Spring) 



CMM 455:Ser/r70/? Design: IVIethods and Theory 

Study and practice in the basic elements of sermon production: creativeness 
in sermon preparation; determining the theme; organization; style; delivery; 
and judging results. Yearly. Staff 

(Winter) 



CMM 480-485-490: f/e/c/ Education Project I, II, III 

Geaney 
(Fall, Winter, Spring) 

CMM 495: Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) 



48 



CMM 496: Pastoral Teacher Education (PTE) 

CMM 497: Pastoral Internship (PI) 

A two-quarter pastoral internship for priests, deacons, and non-ordained min- 
isters under the guidance of qualified supervisors. The internship begins with 
a workshop in which the interns and supervisors together plan and contract 
for the goals, tasks, and methods of evaluation of the intern experience. 
There is a regular schedule of reports to and evaluation by the supervisor and 
CTU Director of Field Education during the course of the program. Further de- 
tails are available from the Office of the Director of Field Education. 

CMM 495, 496 and 497: By arrangement with Director of Field Education. 

CMM SOS: Advanced Practicum in Pastoral Counseling 

Prerequisite is CMM 405, or equivalent. The practicum requires enrollment 
for all three quarters. It consists of live counseling of high school students, 
with on-going supervision on a weekly basis. Chiaramonte and Bush 

(Fall. Winter, Spring) 

CMM 508: Existential Psychotherapy and Pastoral Practice 

This course examines the important influence that existential philosophy has 
come to have upon the development of psychotherapy. Emphasis will be 
placed upon the contributions to psychotherapy made by the existential analy- 
sis and interpretation of individual experience in a crisis society. The authors 
studied will be: Paul Tillich, Ludwig Binswanger, Medard Boss, Thomas Mora, 
F.J.J. Buytendijk, Rollo May and Eugene Kahn. Newbold 

(Winter) 

CMM S09: Psychology and Religious Experience 

The course will attempt to uncover the psychological roots of religion and to 
examine methodological problems involved in the study of religious experi- 
ence. It will also consider the relationship between Christian orthopraxis and 
various forms of psychotherapy. Heisig 

(Winter) 

CMM S}B: Practicum in Liturgy 

An examination of the theology and the general principles pertaining to litur- 
gical celebration and the proper role of the minister in liturgy. Study of ritual 
and practical considerations in the celebration of wedding, funeral and sacra- 
mental liturgies. Practical, moral, canonical and pastoral considerations per- 
taining to the sacrament of penance. Special treatment of the principles of 
Eucharistic celebration. Individual practical exercises in administration of 
penance and celebration of Eucharist. Yearly. Staff 

(Spring) 

CMM 530: Research Seminar in Area Studies 

Individually guided reading program in the history and culture of specific 
countries, as well as their present social, economic and religious situations. 
Yearly. Boberg 

(Winter) 



49 



CMM 535: Development of the Christian Community 

After a brief survey of the biblical/theological basis, this seminar type 
course emphasizes the sociological factors that bear on the process of Chris- 
tian community formation and its relationship to community development on 
the socio-economic plane. Boberg 

(Winter) 

CMM 540: Nationalism 

A seminar that investigates the relation of mission to colonialism and the 
problems in a post-colonial period of nationalism. Individual students will be 
expected to concentrate on one country or area. Boberg 

(Fall) 
CMM 541: World Poverty, Development, Liberation 

An investigation of poverty in the "third world", with its distinctive culture; 
the use and misuses of development; the mission of the Church in relation 
to liberation. 1976-1977. Boberg 



CMM 545: Cultural Anthropology 

Introduction to essential concepts of cultural anthropology with application 
to missionary work. 

CMM 546: Religions and Societies 

The interrelation of religion and society is shown by presenting and analyzing 
the world's major religious traditions against the background of the specific 
cultures involved. The methods and insights of comparative religion, anthro- 
pology and sociology characterize the scope of this approach. Loiskandl 

(Fall) 

CMM 560: The Interpretive Dimension of Ministry 

A seminar dealing with the understanding of ministry, its functions, and in 
particular with the problems related to understanding, translating, and com- 
municating the Christian message in educational ministry. Mainelli 

(Winter) 

CMM 563: Structuring a Parish Model of Educational Ministry 

A seminar exploring the practice of parishes in educational ministry, and 
developing theological principles for critiquing these practices and toward a 
model for more effective ministry to the total parish. Will entail some work 
in developmental theories, models of the church, and organizational princi- 
ples. Mainelli 

(Fall) 

CMM 597: Independent Study 
Content and structure by arrangement. 



PROGRAM OF WORLD MISSION (CTU)* 
BLL 490: Biblical Foundations of Mission 

50 



HDS 307: The Christianization of Europe 

HDS 400: Studies in Comparative Religion 

HDS 422: 19th Century Imperialism and World Mission 

HDS 432: The Problem of God and Other Religions 

HDS 436: Eschatology and Eschatologies 

HDS 446: Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

HDS 453: Myths, Signs, Symbols and Sacraments 

HDS 466: Christian Attitudes Towards World Religions 

HDS 505: Constructing Local Theologies 

HDS 570: Theology of Revolution 

CMM 440: Christianity in World History 

CMM 445: Missionary Catechetics 

CMM 509: Psychology and Religious Experience 

CMM 530: Research Seminar in Area Studies 

CMM 535: Development of Christian Community 

CMM 540: Nationalism 

CMM 541 : World Poverty, Development, Liberation 

CMM 545: Cultural Anthropology 

CMM 546:f^eligions and Societies 

* Some of these CTU courses, whose descriptions can be found above, are 

offered bi-annually. Courses of other Cluster Schools which can be taken as 

part of the Program are to be found in the 1975-1976 CCTS Announcements. 

CLUSTER AREAS OF CONCENTRATION (CCTS) 

The following programs of concentration in preparation for ministry are being 
offered cooperatively by the member schools of the Chicago Cluster of Theo- 
logical Schools in 1975-1976. For full details of these programs see the CCTS 
Announcements. 

CCTS 400: Personal Transformation: Intensive Unit I 

Anderson. Sears, Steam 
(Winter) 

CCTS 420: Social Transformation: Intensive Unit I 

Benne, Leiiaert, Pero, Tuite 
(Fall and Winter) 

CCTS 440: Celebration: Intensive Unit I 

Linss, Miller, R. Snyder, Piacitelli 

(Winter) 

CCTS 460: Cross-Cultural Communication: Intensive Unit I 

Boberg, Dudley, Loiskandl. Poethig 

(Spring) 
CCTS 480: Interpretation and Communication: Teaching 

Mainelli, Ross, G. Snyder, Rathbun 
(Winter and Spring) 

51 



Register of Students 







1974-1975 








FIRST 


YEAR PROGRAM 






Name 


Community or Home 


Degree 




Diocese 




Candidacy 


Bobish, M. 


M.S.C. 


Pulaski, Pa. 


M.Div. 


M.A. 


Brunelle, D. 


M.S.C. 


Manchester, N.H. 


M.Div. 


M.A. 


Grooms, J. 


S.V.D. 


Tulsa, Okla. 


M.Div. 




DeManuele, J. 


C.P. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


M.Div. 




Eaton, J. 


O.F.M. 


Ashland, Wise. 


M.Div. 




Egan, R. 


C.S.V. 


Tucson, Ariz. 


M.Div. 




Feehan, P. 


O.F.M. 


Columbus, Nebr. 


M.Div. 




Foley, A. 


O.S.A. 


Bicton, W. Australia 


M.Div. 




Fox, D. 


O.S.A. 


Detroit, Mich. 


M.Div. 




Friebel, R. 


C.PP.S. 


Shelby, Ohio 


M.Div. 




Fry, G. 


S.V.D. 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


M.Div. 




Gallagher, P. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div. 




Germalic, J. 




Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div. 




Gibbons, D. 


O.Praem. 


St. Paul, Minn. 


M.Div. 




Gibbs, P. 


S.V.D. 


Hamilton, New Zealand 


M.Div. 




Harman, S. 


O.S.A. 


Bellevue, Ohio 


M.Div. 


M.A. 


Hibbard, J. 


O.S.A. 


Dolton, III. 


M.Div. 




Horstman, J. 


S.V.D. 


Springfield, Ohio 


M.Div. 




Janezic, L. 


O.F.M. 


Newburgh hits., Ohio 


M.Div. 




Karnia, G. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div. 




Kelly, J. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div. 




Lanning, M. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div. 


M.A. 


Martinelli, J. 


S.V.D. 


Salem, Ohio 


M.Div. 


M.A. 


Mayo, M. 


S.V.D. 


New Orleans, La. 


M.Div. 




McGraw, R. 


S.V.D. 


Winthrop, Iowa 


M.Div. 




Mooney, N. 


S.V.D. 


Hanrahan, La. 


M.Div. 




Nelkie, M. 


C.PP.S. 


TawasCity, Mich. 


M.Div. 




Nollen, T. 


S.V.D. 


Burlington, Iowa 


M.Div. 




Noonan, J. 


S.V.D. 


New York, N.Y. 


M.Div. 




Offner, D. 


O.S.A. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


M.Div. 




Painter, C. 


O.S.A. 


Cumberland, Md. 


M.Div. 




Paquet, M. 


O.S.C. 


Beauce, Quebec 


M.Div. 




Petraitis, D. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div. 




Philipp, M. 


S.C.J. 


Milwaukee, Wise. 


M.Div. 




Prickel, N. 


S.C.J. 


Batesville, Ind. 


M.Div. 




Roessler, R. 


C.PP.S. 


Dayton, Ohio 


M.Div. 




Schroeder, R. 


S.V.D. 


New Bavaria, Ohio 


M.A. 




Spilker, K. 


O.F.M. 


Parma, Ohio 


M.Div. 




Wadell, P. 


C.P. 


Louisville, Ky. 


M.Div. 


M.A. 


Wiesen, C. 


S.V.D. 


Des Moines, Iowa 


M.Div. 




Williams, C. 


C.PP.S. 


Tuscaloosa, Ala. 


M.Div. 


M.A. 


Wilson, 0. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div. 


M.A. 



52 



Name 



UPPER LEVEL DEGREE CANDIDATES 
Community or 
Diocese 



Alfvegren, G. 


C.P. 


Anthony, E. 


O.F.M. 


Balik, L. 


S.V.D. 


Bauer, D. 


S.V.D. 


Beirne, P. 


S.V.D. 


Bilski.T. 


O.F.M. 


Bodden, C. 


O.S.A. 


Bossie, R. 


S.C.J. 


Bou, P. 


S.V.D. 


Brick, J. 


S.V.D. 


Byrnes, W. 


C.S.Sp. 


Callahan, V. 


O.S.M. 


Carlos, J. 


O.F.M. 


Carpenter, W. 


C.S.V. 


Cassldy, J. 


O.S.C. 


Ciccone, A. 


O.S.M. 


Clark, D. 


C.M.F. 


Cornelia, G. 


C.PP.S. 


Conley, J. 


C.P. 


Conlon, T. 


O.S.C. 


Cottingham, D. 


C.S.Sp. 


Crowley, T. 


C.S.Sp. 


Davey, P. 


O.S.B. 


Deftenbaugh, T. 


O.S.A. 


Dewey, M. 


O.P. 


Dex9l, D. 


C.S.Sp. 


Doctor, J. 


O.F.M. 


Donovan, W. 


O.Praem 


Dreffein, L. 


O.F.M. 


Feldner, W. 


S.V.D. 


Fenske, T. 


O.F.M. 


Fischer, A. 


O.F.M. 


Fischer, W. 


O.Praem 


Gins, Paul 


O.S.M. 


Gomez, J. 


S.V.D. 


Halstead, J. 


O.S.A. 


Hartway, A. 


C.PP.S. 


Hilgert, J. 


C.P. 


Huels, J. 


O.S.M. 


Hutchins, M. 


S.V.D. 


Jablonski, J. 


M.S.C. 


Jagdfeld, L. 


O.F.M. 


James, M. 


S.V.D. 


Jones, H. 


O.F.M. 


Kass, T. 


C.S.V. 


Keliher, M. 


C.S.V. 


Keller, K. 


O.S.B. 


Korolewski, L. 




Krantz, E. 


C.PP.S. 


* Degree conferred May, 1975. 



Home 


Degree 




Candidacy 


Whittier, Calif. 


M.Div., M.A. 


AllentowQ, Pa. 


M.DJv. 


Ft. Atkinson, Iowa 


M.Div.* 


Toledo, Ohio 


M.Div.* 


Brisbane, Australia 


M.Div.* 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div.* 


Fond du Lac, Wise. 


M.Div., M.A. 


Boston, Mass. 


M.Div. 


Corozal, Puerto Rico 


M.Div. 


Victoria, Australia 


M.Div. 


Levittown, Pa. 


M.Div.* 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


M.Div.* 


Joliet, III. 


M.Div.* 


Peoria, III. 


M.Div. 


Fairmont, Nebr. 


M.Div. 


Piazzola, Napoli, Italy 


M.A. 


Green Bay, Wise. 


M.Div., M.A. 


Waukegan, III. 


M.Div.* 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div. 


Valley City, N.D. 


M.Div. 


Jacksonville, Ala. 


M.Div.*, M.A. 


Jackson, Mich. 


M.Div. 


Oglesby, III. 


M.A. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


M.Div.* 


Adrian, Mich. 


M.A. 


Royal Oak, Mich. 


M.Div., M.A. 


Mokena, III. 


M.Div. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div., M.A. 


Milwaukee, Wise. 


M.Div.* 


Parma, Ohio 


M.Div.* 


Trenton, III. 


M.Div.* 


Muskegon, Mich. 


M.Div. 


Columbus, Ohio 


M.Div.* 


El Paso, Texas 


M.A. 


Flint, Mich. 


M.Div., M.A. 


Matteson, III. 


M.Div., M.A. 


Mason, Mich. 


M.Div.* 


St. Louis, Mo. 


M.Div., M.A. 


Dubuque, Iowa 


M.Div., M.A. 


Youngstown, Ohio 


M.Div., M.A 


Milwaukee, Wise. 


M.Div.* 


Washington, D.C. 


M.Div. 


Fremont, Mich. 


M.Div. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div. 


Kankakee, III. 


M.Div.* 


Aurora, III. 


M.A. 


Fairmont, Nebr. 


M.A. 


Atwater, Ohio 


M.Div. 



53 



Name 


Community or 


Home 


Degree 




Diocese 




Candidacy 


Langenkamp, J. 


C.PP.S. 


St. Henry, Ohio 


M.Div.* 


Lechtenberg, R. 


O.F.M. 


Quincy, III. 


M.A. 


Legania, R. 




New Orleans, La. 


M.Div.*, M.A. 


Lenchak, T. 


S.V.D. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div., M.A. 


Lessard, W. 


C.PP.S. 


Richmond, Va. 


M.Div. 


Lewandowski , A. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div. 


Lopez, R. 


O.F.M. 


San Antonio, Texas 


M.Div. 


Luebbert, S. 


C.P. 


Florissant, Mo. 


M.Div.* 


Luppi, C. 


S.X. 


Parma, Italy 


M.Div.*, M.A. 


Martinez, V. 


O.S.M. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div.* 


Massaro, R. 


C.S. Sp. 


Narberth, Pa. 


M.Div.*, M.A. 


McCabe, M. 


O.F.M. 


Madison Lake, Minn. 


M.Div.*, M.A. 


McCormick, J. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div. 


McDevitt, T. 


C.P. 


Louisville, Ky. 


M.Div. 


McEvoy, T. 


S.V.D. 


Dublin, Ireland 


M.Div. 


McQuillan, C. 


C.S.Sp. 


Staten Island, N.Y. 


M.Div.* 


Monzyk, J. 


C.P. 


Washington, Mo. 


M.A. 


Moons, J. 


C.P. 


Artesia, La. 


M.Div., M.A. 


Morrison, S. 


O.S.C. 


Cloquet, Minn. 


M.Div., M.A. 


Mudd, S. 


C.P. 


Louisville, Ky. 


M.Div. 


Murphy, P. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div. 


Nairn, T. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div.*, M.A. 


Nicolaes, C. 


S.V.D. 


Maastricht, Netherlands 


M.Div. 


O'Donnell, W. 


C.PP.S. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div. 


O'Grady, D. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, III. 


M.Div.* 


O'Neill, M. 


C.S.Sp. 


Orlando, Florida 


M.Div., M.A. 


Padilla, R. 


C.P. 


Texas City, Texas 


M.Div. 


Pall,C. 


O.S.A. 


Evergreen Park, III. 


M.Div. 


Pare, R. 


O.S.A. 


Detroit, Mich. 


M.Div. 


Parthie, R. 


O.F.M. 


Broadview, III. 


M.Div.* 


Pearson, A. 




Des Moines, Iowa 


M.Div., M.A. 


Petermeier, V. 


O.S.C. 


Melrose, Minn. 


M.A.* 


Pitzer, C. 


O.S.C. 


Mandan, N.D. 


M.Div. 


Poppe, D. 


C.P. 


Louisville, Ky. 


M.Div. 


Puopolo, R. 


S.X. 


Norwood, Mass. 


M.Div. 


Radecki, D. 


O.Praem. 


Pulaski, Wise. 


M.Div. 


Ragan, R. 




Hazelcrest, III. 


M.A. 


Rausch, J. 


O.F.M. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


M.Div. 


Rebant, D. 


S.V.D. 


Traverse City, Mich. 


M.A. 


Rochford, E. 


S.V.D. 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


M.Div.* 


Roman, M. 


O.F.M. 


San Antonio, Texas 


M.Div. 


Romero, R. 


O.S.M. 


Durango, Mexico 


M.Div. 


Ruaro, B. 


S.X. 


Valdano, Vicenza, Italy 


M.Div.* 


Ruthenberg, M. 


C.PP.S. 


Detroit, Mich. 


M.Div. 


Ross, R. 


Youngstown 


Youngstown, Ohio 


M.A. 


Schork, J. 


C.P. 


Louisville, Ky. 


M.Div. 


Schramm, M. 


S.V.D. 


Dyersville, Iowa 


M.Div. 


Sieg, R. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div.* 


Slattery, M. 


O.S.A. 


Rockford, III. 


M.Div. 



* Degree conferred May, 1975. 



54 



Name 


Community or 


Home 


Degree 




Diocese 




Candidacy 


Spangenberg, G. 


C.S.Sp. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


M.Div. 


Stang, W. 


C.PP.S. 


Dayton, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Steck, D. 


O.Praem. 


East De Pere, Wise. 


M.A. 


Steinmiller, A. 


C.P. 


Mt. Prospect, III. 


M.Div.* 


Streichardt, W. 


S.V.D. 


Braschosser, W. Germany 


M.Div. 


Studer, F. 


O.S.B. 


Collegeville, Minn. 


M.A.* 


Sullivan, L. 


S.X. 


Needham, Mass. 


M.Div.*, M.A. 


Taylor, D. 


Pittsburgh 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


M.Div.*, M.A. 


Tebbe, T. 


S.V.D. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


M.A. 


Ternes, C. 


A.S.C. 


Red Bud, III. 


M.A. 


Thoman, J. 


C.P. 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


M.Div.* 


Torma, A. 


M.S.C. 


Ashtabula, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Tully, J. 


S.X. 


Lynbrook, N.Y. 


M.Div.* 


Tushar, D. 


C.S.C. 


Gilbert, Minn. 


M.Div. 


Uroda, S. 


S.V.D. 


Detroit, Mich. 


M.Div.* 


Vanden Bergh, G 


S.V.D. 


Green Bay, Wise. 


M.Div. 


Vargas, E. 


S.V.D. 


New York, N.Y. 


M.Div. 


Wanner, J. 


C.PP.S. 


Columbus, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Waring, R. 


S.V.D. 


Phillipsburg, Pa. 


M.Div. 


Weber, M. 


O.Praenn. 


Lake Benton, Minn. 


M.Div., M.A. 


Weiman, M. 


C.S.Sp. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


M.Div.* 


Will, R. 


C.PP.S. 


Chickasaw, Ohio 


M.Div.* 


Willenborg, H. 


O.F.M. 


Teutopolis, III. 


M.Div., M.A. 



Degree conferred May, 1975. 
SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Name 


Community 
or Diocese 


Berry, J. 


o.s.c. 


Brennan, R.** 


O.P. 


Carkhuff, T 


o.s.c. 


DeCanio, T.F.** 


O.P. 


Friday, M. 


S.S.J. 


Gravel, C. 


F.M.S. 


Grubb, F. 


O.Praem. 


Huhn,C. 


O.P. 


Hurley, M. C. 


O.P. 


Mayworm, T. 


S.V.D. 


McGovern, L. 


O.P. 


Peth, E.** 


O.S.B. 


Phelan, J.** 


S.S.N.D. 


Quinn, D. 


O.P. 


Skala, 1. 




Stoltz, E. 


O.P. 


Thelen, M. 


O.P. 


Wetli.C.** 


S.N.D. 


Zraiek, M. 


O.P. 



CONTINUING EDUCATION 
AUDITORS 



Name 

Carney, T. 
Juarez, M. 
Kimminau, I 
Renard, P. 
Tuozzola, L. 



Community 
or Diocese 

M.S.C. 

S.S.N.D. 

O.F.M. 

O.Praem. 

C.S.Sp. 



"Certificate granted t^ay, 1975 



55 





Oalendar 




lavs 


19V5 


JANUARY 1975 


FEBRUARY 1975 


MARCH 1975 


APRIL 1975 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


- - - 1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 '21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 - 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 - 


- 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 - - - -. - 


- - 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

^3 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 - - - 


MAY 1975 


JUNE ' 1975 


JULY 1975 


AUGUST 1975 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F . S 


- - - - 1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


- - 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 - - 


12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


SEPTEMBER 1975 


OCTOBER 1975 


NOVEMBER 1975 


DECEMBER 1975 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


- 1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 - - - - 


- - - 1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 ]7 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 " 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


- 1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 - - - 



1976 Calendar 


IBTS 




JANUARY 1976 

S M T W T F S 

- - - - 1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 1976 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 


MARCH 1976 

S M T W T F S 

- 1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 - - - 


APRIL 1976 

S M T W T ^ S 

- - - - 1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 - 


MAY 1976 

S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


JUNE 1976 

5 M T W T F S 

- - 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 - - - 


JULY 1976 

S M T W T F S 

- - - - 1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


AUGUST 1976 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 - - - - 


SEPTEMBER 1976 

S M T W T F S 

- - - 1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 - - 


OCTOBER 1976 

S M T W T F S 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


NOVEMBER 1976 

S M T W T F S 

- 1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 - - - - 


DECEMBER 1976 

S M T W T F S 

- - - 1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 "